THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED WORKSHOPS

From 2015 LegalAliens ha started running Theatre of the Oppressed workshops with young people, migrants and refugees.

Our sessions involve warm up games directly inspired by August Boal’s “Games for an actors and non actors” in which participants discover space and movement through group and pair work, followed by simple devising tasks like creating a group sculpture or a multi-voice poem, and finally by improvisation.

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We run complete “forum theatre” sessions, in which participants are invited to share an example of “oppression”, the example is performed, discussed, then performed a second time but this time everyone in the audience is invited to “freeze” the scene and swap with one of the actors in order to change the dynamics and potentially turn the victim into a winner

We’ve run sessions in schools, youth centre and recently during IGNITE! the annual event organised by The Challenge UK to empower young people.

If you run a school, youth centre, refugee centre or charity and are interested in Forum Theatre or in a Theatre of the Oppressed session please contact us at info@legalaliens.org

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue sea

With the refugees crisis becoming more and more prominent in the news, with threats or more war in the Middle East and further displacement of people, we feel, as artist, the need to use theatre to make sense of what is going on around us.

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LegalAliens’ project Between the Devil and the Deep Blue sea has two purposes

– Offer theatre workshops to refugees and asylum seekers, based on Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed, in order for them not only to share their stories but to try and make sense of their experiences, the differences between expectations and the reality of their new “host” country, understand the real meaning of language and culture – there’s a lot of talking about “befriending” but what is really a friend? What does the word mean in different languages, which kind of responsibilities it carries?

– Create a play inspired by the stories we hear as well as multimedia events featuring photos, videos, audio contributions and art.

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We’ve created a Facebook page, called Between the devil and the deep blue sea (https://www.facebook.com/migratingstories/?fref=ts) and we invite anyone who has a story to contribute

LETS HEAR THE MIGRANTS’ VOICE: a collaboration in search of stories

Migrants come and steal our jobs.

Migrants don’t speak our language properly and I can’t understand them.

Migrants speak their language on the bus and I feel intimidated.

I can’t recognise my neighbourhood anymore because migrants set up their shops.

Migrants’ children slow down the rest of the class at school

Migrants cause crime.

Migrants are terrorist

Migrants should go back to their country

Because of migrants hospitals are overcrowded.

A British politician recently, arriving late at a meeting, even managed to blame the traffic on the motorway on migrants.

But who are this headless, grey, threatening crowd we generally label as “migrants”?

As a company dedicated to explore the impact of multiculturalism on our societies, we thought it was hight time we gave “migrants” an identity and a voice. We want to discover people’s stories, journeys, dreams, experiences. We want to get to know them as individuals and listen to their point of view.

Thanks to the amazing charity MIGRANT VOICE (http://www.migrantvoice.org/) we’ve been given the chance to do just that. On the 30th of January we’ll run a workshop with a group of immigrants from different countries living in the UK, encouraging them to use theatre to express their point of view and tell THEIR stories.

We’re incredibly excited and honoured to begin this collaboration.

Keep an eye on this blog for future developments. And if you’re a non British citizen living in the UK and affected by issues regarding immigration, please contact  info@migrantvoice.org to get involved.

“Migrant Voice will transform how migrants are seen and heard in the media: from passive, disempowered and marginalised victims, to makers of their own media content. It will mobilise migrants who are concerned about the way their communities are portrayed by the media to engage in positively influencing the immigration debate and changing public attitude.”